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Posts from the ‘Operating Systems’ Category

17
Jul

Running Webex on Ubuntu

Webex Logo

Webex running on Ubuntu and other non-Windows platforms is literally a click away, in this case the CMR (Collaboration Meeting Room).

Webex is a fact of life for many people and for many Linux (BSD and other non-Windows) users, it has been a thorn in the side with people going so far as to set up virtual machines just to run Cisco’s collaboration software. While Webex is written in Java, it isn’t so simple to get running everywhere and apparently not all features are available for non-Windows users.

Most likely you are running up against the following message after logging into *.webex.com

Your browser,browser version, or operating system is currently unsupported

This requires the intervention of whoever is administrating the *.webex.com account and they can modify it in the following way.

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21
Jun

Using Qemu and Chroot to replace your cross-compile toolchain

RaspberryPi Logo

Awhile back I wrote about how you can set up a cross-compile toolchain for compiling on x86_64 with the Raspberry Pi as a target. There is another, perhaps easier way to do the same thing by using Qemu 2.0 as your backend.

By installing and enabling Qemu support, you can run code compiled for another architecture (that is supported by Qemu) on your native machine. You can then create a Chroot environment, perhaps similar to what you have on your Raspberry Pi, and run it as if it was natively.

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5
Nov

Vagrant, Virtualbox and Ubuntu Wily Weerwolf: Getting them to play along.

Vagrant

I recently upgraded to Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Weerwolf) which automatically upgraded VirtualBox from 4.3 to 5.0 and broke compatibility with Vagrant 1.6 in the process. Thinking that Vagrant knows about this and they claim VBox 5.0 compatbility, I upgraded to 1.7 and came across the same error!

Vagrant attempted to execute the capability ‘configure_networks’ on the detect guest OS ‘linux’

There is a workaround!

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7
May

Cross-compiling for Raspberry Pi on Ubuntu

RaspberryPi Logo

While the Raspberry Pi 2 has four cores to churn through code, it still takes longer to compile than on most workstations and laptops. If you are feeling adventurous, you can try cross-compiling which has become easier to set up and get working.

Cross-compiling is when binaries created are for another target architecture than the one you are compiling on. This kind of set up is very typical when creating Android applications. The end result is that you can take the resulting binary and place on its target platform, and it will run there.

There are even tricks to getting the cross-compiled binary to also run on your native system!

In this guide, I’ll walk you through:

  • Setting up a cross-compile toolchain in Ubuntu (15.04 Vivid)
  • Setting up the proper exports
  • Compiling a test program for your native and target armhf platform
  • Compiling the latest Raspberry Pi 2 kernel with VC4 support.

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22
Dec

Enterprise all your Twisted applications with Ldaptor

2000px-Twisted_Logo_(software).svg

We’re proud to announce the release of 14.0.0 of Ldaptor, now a first party Twisted project! Ldaptor is an asynchronous LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) client and server implementation written for Twisted in Python.

The biggest change is that Ldaptor is now sponsored by Amplidata. Through them we were able to get development, bug fixes and Twisted first-party sponsorship back online. We now have continuous integration (CI) with a wide matrix of support for py26/py27/pypy using Twisted 12.1 to 14.0 (and trunk). We also have about 75% code coverage with unit testing!

You can download 14.0.0 and other releases here: Ldaptor Github Releases

For a full review of what has changed, feel free to take a look at our live documentation over at ReadTheDocs: Ldaptor Documentation and the Changelog itself.

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