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Recent Articles

23
Jun

Worldsynth 0.11.0 released

Rivers

Worldsynth version 0.11.0 is released and can be found on github.

In this release we’ve added an additional algorithm for heightmap generation based on Ken Perlin‘s work in noise generation. We decoupled the sea-level to be configurable based on percentage, which in addition to masks we can now create islands. You can also save your world and open it up later since we use pytables to store our settings, metadata and our data in an open hdf5 format. You can also export your heightmap in 16-bit PNG greyscale or even import from a wide array of images formats as a heightmap. Importing from an image creates a 16-bit precision greyscale heightmap. In addition to this, one commenter ask about Python3 support, well now you have it.

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Written by Bret Curtis

6
May

Upgrade Samsung Galaxy Gio to CyanogenMod 10.1

After about a year of Gingerbread (2.2.3) and CyanogenMod (7.2), I thought it was time again to look at further upgrades to my Galaxy Gio. This was apparently enough time for developers to work out problems involved in dealing with Ice Cream Sandwich (4.0.x) and Jelly Bean (4.[1-2].x) such as no ICS (or greater) libs and codecs from Qualcomm for the MSM7x27 family of chips for hardware acceleration.

Thanks to the Samsung Galaxy Gio community at xda-developers, we now have CyanogenMod (10.1) which is based on Jelly Bean (4.2.2) that is usable for every day use. There are a few things that I’ve noticed that are not perfect, but it is a fully usable ROM. Before you do anything suggested below, it is wise to first backup anything you think important and not just to your SD as it will be overwritten to support an extra ext4 partition that can be used to store your applications and save valuable space. Make sure your SD is rated 6 or better.

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Written by Bret Curtis

7
Mar

Worldsynth 0.10.0 released

Rivers

Worldsynth version 0.10.0 is released and can be found on github. This is our first “official” release in which the result should work, out of the box, with a usable and familiar GUI instead of the pygame environment. This is provided by Qt4 via PySide. We have even tested Worldsynth on Windows XP to validate that it is indeed cross platform.

As for 0.11.0, we are looking to unlock size of terrain to be of any variable width and height instead of the basic power of two. We are also investigating fluvial erosion.

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Written by Bret Curtis

5
Mar

Latency simulation over long fat network

World NetworkOne of our clients asked us how we handle latency, and not just a few ms across racks but 2 and even 3 digit ms latency that indicates geographically separate locations across continents, not just a country. Not only that, the “pipes” involved are 10Gbps and we had to fill them. We have the theories and made models of how it would work. We perhaps might not be able to fill a 10Gbps fully with one stream, we could fill it with multiple streams but we had to validate this conclusion.

The question now becomes, how do we test this. We’ve done our research and there are only a few commercial solutions available like the Netropy 10G2 which is a 4 port, 2 lane hardware latency simulator for $30,000 new. Not only is that outside my budget, it is still limited to simulating 2 10Gbps pipes while we need at least 3 lanes (6 ports) and possibility to expand to more as necessary. We decided it was cheaper in terms of total cost to put the research into creating our own Latency Simulator.

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Written by Bret Curtis

11
Feb

Introducing worldsynth for your world generation and building needs

Rivers

After many years of development in my spare time, I’ve decided to release Worldsynth as a Free and Open Source Software. As a world generator, it fills the roll and can also be rapidly extended to support additional features. The source might not be of top quality, but the main purpose of creating it has been fulfilled and I want to share it. I only hope that others will find it useful and want to build upon it.

There is still much more functionality that I would like add and additional polishing to the user interface. Midway through I switched from pygame to pyside or Qt4 for the GUI. I consider it ready for “Alpha” at this point, meaning there might be bugs and few experimental features that may break but otherwise usable.

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Written by Bret Curtis