Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘linux’

17
Jul

Running Webex on Ubuntu

Webex Logo

Webex running on Ubuntu and other non-Windows platforms is literally a click away, in this case the CMR (Collaboration Meeting Room).

Webex is a fact of life for many people and for many Linux (BSD and other non-Windows) users, it has been a thorn in the side with people going so far as to set up virtual machines just to run Cisco’s collaboration software. While Webex is written in Java, it isn’t so simple to get running everywhere and apparently not all features are available for non-Windows users.

Most likely you are running up against the following message after logging into *.webex.com

Your browser,browser version, or operating system is currently unsupported

This requires the intervention of whoever is administrating the *.webex.com account and they can modify it in the following way.

Read moreRead more

21
Jun

Using Qemu and Chroot to replace your cross-compile toolchain

RaspberryPi Logo

Awhile back I wrote about how you can set up a cross-compile toolchain for compiling on x86_64 with the Raspberry Pi as a target. There is another, perhaps easier way to do the same thing by using Qemu 2.0 as your backend.

By installing and enabling Qemu support, you can run code compiled for another architecture (that is supported by Qemu) on your native machine. You can then create a Chroot environment, perhaps similar to what you have on your Raspberry Pi, and run it as if it was natively.

Read moreRead more

7
May

Cross-compiling for Raspberry Pi on Ubuntu

RaspberryPi Logo

While the Raspberry Pi 2 has four cores to churn through code, it still takes longer to compile than on most workstations and laptops. If you are feeling adventurous, you can try cross-compiling which has become easier to set up and get working.

Cross-compiling is when binaries created are for another target architecture than the one you are compiling on. This kind of set up is very typical when creating Android applications. The end result is that you can take the resulting binary and place on its target platform, and it will run there.

There are even tricks to getting the cross-compiled binary to also run on your native system!

In this guide, I’ll walk you through:

  • Setting up a cross-compile toolchain in Ubuntu (15.04 Vivid)
  • Setting up the proper exports
  • Compiling a test program for your native and target armhf platform
  • Compiling the latest Raspberry Pi 2 kernel with VC4 support.

Read moreRead more

3
Oct

Wireless BCM4312 with the 3.10, 3.11, 3.12 and 3.13 kernels

Broadcom Chipset BCM4312
The hybrid driver from Broadcom was updated again in September (2013) with all the previous patches and a few other fixes as well. This brings them up to support linux kernel 3.9, which is very much welcome.

Sadly it breaks again with >= 3.10 with many warnings and errors which isn’t good considering that Ubuntu (13.10) Saucy Salamander is about to be released.

We do have a patch for you though that gets us working again up to the 3.11 kernel.

Chipsets supported by “Broadcom’s IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n hybrid Linux® device driver” are: BCM4311, BCM4312, BCM4313, BCM4321, BCM4322, BCM43224, BCM43225, BCM43227 and BCM43228.

Read moreRead more

23
Jun

Worldsynth 0.11.0 released

Rivers

Worldsynth version 0.11.0 is released and can be found on github.

In this release we’ve added an additional algorithm for heightmap generation based on Ken Perlin‘s work in noise generation. We decoupled the sea-level to be configurable based on percentage, which in addition to masks we can now create islands. You can also save your world and open it up later since we use pytables to store our settings, metadata and our data in an open hdf5 format. You can also export your heightmap in 16-bit PNG greyscale or even import from a wide array of images formats as a heightmap. Importing from an image creates a 16-bit precision greyscale heightmap. In addition to this, one commenter ask about Python3 support, well now you have it.

Read moreRead more